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2023 Fundraising Event - Lecture Series

Registrations are now open!

Lectures by

March 7th

How to Live With What Lives in Your Garden

Presented by
Master Gardener
Judith Cox

April 4th

Getting Started, Taking Stock

Presented by
Master Gardener
Rebecca Last

April 18th

Your Dreams and Nature’s Needs

Presented by
Master Gardener
Candace Dressler

May 2nd

Garden Design with Nature in Mind

Presented by
Master Gardeners
Agnieszka Keough &
Claire McCaughey

May 16th

Create a Beautiful Garden with Keystone Native Plants

Presented by
Master Gardeners
Josie Pazdzior &
Adair Heuchan

March 7th

How to Live With What Lives in Your Garden

Presented by Master Gardener
Judith Cox

April 4th

Getting Started, Taking Stock

Presented by Master Gardener
Rebecca Last

April 18th

Your Dreams and Nature’s Needs

Presented by Master Gardener
Candace Dressler

May 2nd

Garden Design with Nature in Mind

Presented by Master Gardeners
Agnieszka Keough &
Claire McCaughey

May 16th

Create a Beautiful Garden with Keystone Native Plants

Presented by Master Gardeners
Josie Pazdzior &
Adair Heuchan

Photography credits:
Judith Cox • Suzanne Juneau • Candace Dressler • Agnieszka Keough • Gillian Boyd • Julianne Labreche

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Most spring bulbs, like tulips, need a chilling period in order to trigger growth and bloom. Bulbs for forcing have been given an early artificial chilling, so they can be potted up and start growing indoors while it’s still winter outside.

 

You can try doing this at home by putting them in the fridge (they need a temperature of about 4°C) in a mesh bag so they’ll be well ventilated. If they’re in a sealed plastic bag they could build up moisture and rot. The caveat here is that tulips and daffodils need 12-16 weeks of chilling, so starting their cold period this late means they won’t be ready to grow any sooner than their compatriots outdoors.

Clivias (Clivia miniata, also known as kaffir lily) offsets may take only a year or two to reach flowering age. Flowering season is late winter/early spring. To encourage bloom, your clivia should have a rest period:

  • Starting in late fall, stop watering it (unless you see it wilting, then add a little water).
  • Keep it in a cool place, if possible, during this time (8-10°C), with indirect light.
  • After 12-14 weeks, you can bring the plant back to warmer temperatures.
  • Start watering more thoroughly, but only when the top 2 cm of soil is dry.Clivias don’t like wet feet. Hopefully your plant will start blooming in 6-12 weeks.

There are other considerations too. Sometimes they need more light in summer to trigger flowering, such as spending the summer outdoors in part shade. They are also more likely to flower if they are pot-bound, so a recently repotted plant probably won’t flower.

Contact the Ottawa Valley Wild Bird Care Centre whose staff and volunteers work to rehabilitate and release injured birds back into the wild. Check out the website for further information: wildbirdcarecentre.org

I like gardening — it's a place where I find myself when I need to lose myself.

Alice Sebold, author

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS!

Master Gardeners of Ontario Inc. is a registered volunteer run charity. Your donation will be greatly appreciated and will go toward MGOI inspired gardening programs and help defray the costs in delivery of our services. 

Please direct your donation to GROUP OTTAWA-CARLETON when selecting the fund. A tax receipt will be generated immediately.

Thank you to MG members for sharing beautiful photos:
Susan Bicket • Catherine Disley • Suzanne Juneau • Julianne Labreche • Rebecca Last • Barbara Long • Nancy McDonald • Josie Pazdzior • Lee Ann Smith • Mary Ann Van Berlo